You Don't Have To Do Everything & Be Everywhere

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The other day I was starting some creative work when I felt a sense of overwhelm. 

I love the work I'm creating in this space and I have so many amazing ideas that I want to share with you.

I am constantly dreaming up blog posts, letters, offerings and services that I can share with you that can help you in your own creative business. I light up when I'm able to share my gifts and experiences with you.

But, this day - I started to write down a to-do list on my notes page in my phone. It looked something like this:

  • write Sunday's letter

  • draft Mailchimp freebie

  • write up podcast episodes for maternity leave

  • take photos for Instagram

  • create Pinterest graphics for podcast episodes

  • write outline for email course

  • write up blog posts for maternity leave

  • create Pinterest graphics for blog posts

  • build online Library

  • update website design

  • look for a business coach

And believe me when I say that this wasn't the end of it.

I sat back in my chair and just thought to myself "I can't do all of this." But, honestly, that wasn't the whole truth. It wasn't that I couldn't do all of that - I just simply didn't want to.

My lack of wanting to create these resources for you wasn't rooted in not believing in their value. Most of everything listed above are things I've done and used for my own business - I'd just be sharing my knowledge and experience to help you as well.

But, my lack of wanting to was because I know how I'd feel after doing all of that.

See, when I decided to finally own my talents and take the leap into helping other creatives in their businesses through the spiritual and intuitive tools I use, I knew I needed a change.

I knew that I couldn't continue trying to be everything, to everybody and be everywhere. I had tried that route before and the benefit did not outweigh the toll it took on my body, heart, and mind. 

Because of this, I decided to get super clear on what parts of my business brought me joy and what I was willing to let go of to feel and work the way that was best for me.

I want to enjoy doing the work as much as I enjoy sharing the work.

And I know, for me, that I can't do both of those things when I feel stressed out, overwhelmed, stretched too thin and not taken care of.

Maybe you've felt this before - that feeling of wearing all of the hats in the business and being "too busy"?

Or maybe you've felt like you have to do everything and be everywhere to be "successful" in your business?

Consider these mindset shifts and see if any of them could work for you moving forward.

  • Could you give yourself permission to post less on social media?

  • Could you hire an intern or Virtual Assistant whose an expert in areas that are challenging for you?

  • Can you focus on creating really amazing content in 2 areas that bring you joy rather than 5 that bring overwhelm?

  • Could you make your website extremely simple so it requires less maintenance and updates?

  • Can you revisit your income goals and see if you need to be doing as much work as you are?

  • Can you raise your prices and take on fewer clients/projects/etc.?

  • Can you make an investment and hire an expert to do the website update/newsletter setup/course creation for you?


These are just a few mindset shifts that are possible for you - but the options are truly endless.

I encourage you to constantly enjoy BEING in your business as much as you share your business with others.


If you are overwhelmed or overworked, you'll feel it in your products, services, and offerings which means your best work won't come through.


OVER TO YOU...

What are some things within your creative business that you can left go of to create more room for the things that bring you joy?

I'd love for you to comment below and share your thoughts.

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BusinessLaura PayneComment